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A Tuesday, Nov. 29, presentation at RSNA 2016 featured Joint Commission member and practicing medical physicist Tyler S. Fisher, MD, discussing compliance in an imaging department, including the commission’s two new focuses: justification and dose optimization.

 
RSNA 2016: More research, awareness needed in fight against prostate cancer

The negative impact of prostate cancer is woefully underestimated by the public, according to Colleen A. Lawton, MD, professor and vice chair of radiation oncology at the Medical College of Wisconsin. She reviewed the history of prostate cancer screening and treatment in the Annual Oration in Radiation Oncology address at RSNA 2016.

 - RSNA Concourse
RSNA 2016: What’s up with the new Joint Commission regulations?

A Tuesday, Nov. 29, presentation at RSNA 2016 featured Joint Commission member and practicing medical physicist Tyler S. Fisher, MD, discussing compliance in an imaging department, including the commission’s two new focuses: justification and dose optimization.

 - N. Reed Dunnick
RSNA 2016: Organizational change requires strong physician leadership

Academic medicine does a great job of producing physicians—but leaders? Not so much. A lack of effective leadership can paralyze an organization, making affecting change all but impossible according to a Sunday afternoon session at RSNA 2016.

 - Michael Walter
RSNA 2016: It’s finally here!

Chicago watched its beloved Cubbies win the World Series earlier this month, and now the city welcomes the imaging industry for another exciting week of breaking news, fascinating presentations and state-of-the-art medical technology. What a fun November for the Windy City! With another RSNA officially underway at McCormick Place, what are you looking forward to the most this year? For me, it all boils down to one thing: the people. 

 - Richard Sharpe Jr., MD, MBA
You don’t have to spend a lot on QI to get a lot back

For the 30 radiologists who staff the medical imaging department at Kaiser Permanente Colorado, the heart of continuous quality improvement lies nearly hidden away in a previously untapped vein of “latent learning” opportunities.