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October/November 2011

By: Julie Ritzer Ross
What qualities make a radiology leader? What experiences best prepare leaders to assume their roles? How do leaders know whether they are performing to the best of their abilities? These were among the questions that Radiology Business Journal recently asked four undisputed industry leaders: a radiology-department chair, a practice president, a practice CEO, and a hospital radiology executive. All four shared a wealth of perspectives and philosophies, using anecdotes and other glimpses into the workings of their organizations to illustrate their points. The Radiology Chair: Putting Creativity to the Test Four years ago, Steven Seltzer, MD, FACS, and his colleagues determined that the department of radiology at Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston, Massachusetts, needed a...
Features
By: Greg Thompson
Number crunchers at radiology practices might occasionally lose sleep over the complex nature of performance assessment, but that’s nothing, compared with the sleepless nights experienced by women...
Features
By: Matthew Skoufalos
The most recent Sentinel Event Alert¹ issued by the Joint Commission formally put the medical world on notice that the expanding use of diagnostic imaging will require more stringent oversight to...
Features
By: Joseph A. Serio, FRMBA, FACMPE, CPA, MBA
In the past, many radiology private practices used a fairly traditional (and extended) track leading to full partnership in the practice. Now, however, many practices are exploring emerging...
Features
By: Cat Vasko
It’s often said that radiology’s product is the report. It’s the crucible where referring physicians judge the effectiveness of their subspecialist colleagues, it’s a primary source document for...
Features
By: George Wiley
It is a well-accepted axiom in business that to be successful, a leader must want to lead. The truth, though, is that business entities often struggle to find leaders because no one really wants to...
Features
By: Staff Writer
I read your article, “Finger in the Wind,”¹ with interest.
Features
By: Cheryl Proval
While health-policy experts debate the potential of accountable-care organizations (ACOs) to address the problem of cost in US health care, a panel held on July 22, 2011, at the RBMA Executive...
Features
By: Staff Writer
Analytics technology is the number-one IT requirement for implementing an accountable-care organization (ACO), according to 197 providers (at 187 organizations) interviewed by KLAS (Orem, Utah) to...
Features
By: Cheryl Proval
I understand that the government does not want to spend money on an imaging examination that is unnecessary. As a fiscal conservative, I have an inherent distaste for waste and actively resent the...
One can’t help but seek significance in the death of someone as iconic as Apple cofounder and CEO Steve Jobs. Of all the things that he meant to those of us who have made our careers in the business...
Features
By: Timothy F. Signorelli, MHFM, FACMPE
The roles of the physician leader and the administrative leader are evolving in new ways. Historically, the physician leader devoted extra time to committees, to being the spokesperson for the...