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Radiology groups merge for numerous business reasons, but an economic case alone rarely makes for an optimal merger. To achieve the type of highly functional, profitable and high quality single unified entity most merger partners desire means dealing with the difficult task of getting two separate groups of people to come together and begin to do more than simply act as one. They must begin to think of themselves as one unified team.

That internalized group identity is best described as the group’s culture. Culture can be tricky to define and even harder to measure. Consider how you would describe yourself. It is much easier to start by describing your

physical attributes, like hair, eye color and height. It is much harder to describe who you are as a person. Likewise,...

Editorial
CMS rearranges the hoops in its proposed rule for value-based payment
Features
As radiology transitions to value-based reimbursement, patient data registries stand to play an increasingly important role
Departments
The radiology community has an opportunity to raise the bar on patient care
Features
A review of lung cancer screening programs from East to West reveals the trials and tribulations of population health management.
Departments
A recent report on best practices in forecasting has the potential for long-range positive impact in many fields, including medical research and the development and operation of healthcare provider...
Features
Four leaders in imaging informatics discuss enterprise imaging goals and strategies at their respective institutions.
Departments
Baptist Health South Florida, a six-hospital system in South Florida, implemented a multidisciplinary low-dose CT lung cancer screening program in July of 2014, spearheaded by 72-radiologist...