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Imaging Informatics

 

AHRA’s annual meeting was held in Nashville, Tenn., in 2016, but this year, it’s trading in cowboy boots and country music for sunshine and that cartoon mouse with the famous laugh. AHRA President Jason Newmark, CRA, took a break from making final preparations for AHRA 2017 in Anaheim, Calif., to speak about some of the biggest issues impacting both the present and future of radiology.

Over the last 10 to 15 years, awareness of the risks of radiation exposure in medical imaging and efforts to reduce dose have escalated exponentially. Imaging equipment vendors have answered the call with dose-reducing strategies that include more sensitive image receptors, better image reconstruction techniques, dose alerts and post-processing software. Radiologists, technologists and physicists have been hard at work as well, edging down dose without compromising image quality. So where do we stand? Are we as low as we can go or is there more that can be done?

The American College of Radiology announced the formation of the Data Science Institute (DSI), an inter-disciplinary organization aiming to guide the implementation of artificial intelligence tools in radiology.

Researchers from the University of Miami used MRI to narrow down the causes of an eye disorder common in astronauts after returning from space, publishing their findings in Radiology.

Researchers from the department of radiology at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center tracked improvements after implementing an image quality reporting system in their clinical practice. The PACS-integrated software allowed radiologists to quickly and easily fill out incident reports for a variety of issues, including missing images, incomplete documentation and labeling, and problems with the image library.

 

Recent Headlines

Reducing Radiation Exposure in Medical Imaging: How Radiology is Making a Difference, One Patient at a Time

Over the last 10 to 15 years, awareness of the risks of radiation exposure in medical imaging and efforts to reduce dose have escalated exponentially. Imaging equipment vendors have answered the call with dose-reducing strategies that include more sensitive image receptors, better image reconstruction techniques, dose alerts and post-processing software. Radiologists, technologists and physicists have been hard at work as well, edging down dose without compromising image quality. So where do we stand? Are we as low as we can go or is there more that can be done?

AHRA 2017: Q&A: President Jason Newmark on CDS, MACRA, Analytics and More

AHRA’s annual meeting was held in Nashville, Tenn., in 2016, but this year, it’s trading in cowboy boots and country music for sunshine and that cartoon mouse with the famous laugh. AHRA President Jason Newmark, CRA, took a break from making final preparations for AHRA 2017 in Anaheim, Calif., to speak about some of the biggest issues impacting both the present and future of radiology.

ACR takes leading role with creation of AI institute

The American College of Radiology announced the formation of the Data Science Institute (DSI), an inter-disciplinary organization aiming to guide the implementation of artificial intelligence tools in radiology.

MRI helps identify source of eye problem for astronauts

Researchers from the University of Miami used MRI to narrow down the causes of an eye disorder common in astronauts after returning from space, publishing their findings in Radiology.

Low-cost reporting system can improve interdepartmental communication

Researchers from the department of radiology at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center tracked improvements after implementing an image quality reporting system in their clinical practice. The PACS-integrated software allowed radiologists to quickly and easily fill out incident reports for a variety of issues, including missing images, incomplete documentation and labeling, and problems with the image library.

Q&A: Baylor College of Medicine's Willis on Radiology-TEACHES program

Students at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston, Texas, are gaining access to a new educational resource called Radiology-TEACHES (Technology Enhanced Appropriateness Criteria Home for Education Simulation), which aims to give students more in-depth knowledge about medical imaging tests.

Penn implements automated follow-up tracker to impressive results

Ensuring patients receive appropriate follow-up imaging after suspicious findings on mammography or other cancer screening is notoriously difficult: about one-third of US women who are surgically treated for breast cancer never undergo their follow-up, slipping through the cracks. Faculty and researchers from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania recognized the need for a reliable monitoring system to guarantee patients receive their clinically-indicated follow-up, creating an automated recommendation-tracking program to identify patients with suspicious lesions on abdominal organs and notify the appropriate care providers.

SIR17: AI chatbot can answer questions about interventional procedures

The same technology that allows Google Translate to “help” high school students with their Spanish homework may soon put an interventional radiologist in your pocket, according to a March 8 session at the Society of Interventional Radiology’s 2017 Annual Scientific Meeting.

Updated mammography metrics: What your practice needs to know

A group of researchers affiliated with the National Institutes of Health’s Breast Cancer Surveillance Consortium provided a much-needed update to statistics on the performance of diagnostic mammography in the U.S., publishing the results in Radiology.

What to consider when selecting new digital radiography systems

As proposed reimbursement changes take place this year for film-screen and in 2018 for computed radiography, your practice just like many others, may be looking into upgrading radiographic equipment to digital radiography (DR).

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