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Imaging Informatics

 

There’s a wealth of usable data in every imaging practice, including performance benchmarks, scanner data and EHR records. Building a business analytics framework to extract and visualize data can be challenging, but the use cases demonstrate impressive gains in productivity and value.

RSNA, Chicago—No two words struck more fear into the hearts of radiologists in 2016 than “artificial” and “intelligence.” The cascading virality of the hashtag #AI only intensified the sense that, slowly but surely, something doomful this way comes.

When it comes to demonstrating radiology’s value, IT will be indispensable, and yes, decision support is part of the platform

Fibromyalgia is an oddity when it comes to musculoskeletal diseases. It’s considered an “arthritis-related condition," but it’s not truly a form of arthritis—it doesn’t cause muscle or joint inflammation. It’s tough to diagnose, problematic to treat and affects women at eight times the rate of men. However, researchers from the University of Colorado-Boulder have identified three neural networks on functional MRI (fMRI) that may represent the first image-based diagnostic method for fibromyalgia.

Three PACS veterans share future hopes and past disappointments about radiology’s great gift to the digital healthcare enterprise

 

Recent Headlines

MEG imaging provides a new way of diagnosing mild traumatic brain injury

Researchers from Simon Fraser University, the Hospital for Sick Children and Defense Research and Development Canada teamed together using magnetoencephalography (MEG) imaging to develop a new technique to improve the diagnosis of mild traumatic brain injury.

RSNA 2016: How to apply business analytics to radiology

There’s a wealth of usable data in every imaging practice, including performance benchmarks, scanner data and EHR records. Building a business analytics framework to extract and visualize data can be challenging, but the use cases demonstrate impressive gains in productivity and value.

RSNA 2016: Radiologists must become as centaurs joined at the midsection to AI

RSNA, Chicago—No two words struck more fear into the hearts of radiologists in 2016 than “artificial” and “intelligence.” The cascading virality of the hashtag #AI only intensified the sense that, slowly but surely, something doomful this way comes.

From Volume to Value: Radiology’s New IT Value Platform

When it comes to demonstrating radiology’s value, IT will be indispensable, and yes, decision support is part of the platform

Zebra Medical introduces new way to analyze medical scans

Zebra Medical Vision announced the launch of Profound, a service with the potential to help people receive fast, accurate medical image analysis over the internet.

Image-based diagnosis for fibromyalgia on the horizon

Fibromyalgia is an oddity when it comes to musculoskeletal diseases. It’s considered an “arthritis-related condition," but it’s not truly a form of arthritis—it doesn’t cause muscle or joint inflammation. It’s tough to diagnose, problematic to treat and affects women at eight times the rate of men. However, researchers from the University of Colorado-Boulder have identified three neural networks on functional MRI (fMRI) that may represent the first image-based diagnostic method for fibromyalgia.

PACS 3.0: The Next Iteration of Radiology’s Reading Platform

Three PACS veterans share future hopes and past disappointments about radiology’s great gift to the digital healthcare enterprise

Stanford uses fMRI to predict success of antidepressants

Stanford Medicine has identified an fMRI metric that could indicate the likelihood of relieving depression with medication, according to a study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences in the United States of America.

In the Heights: The Radiology 100 Achieves a New High, Steady Growth Prevails

The nation’s largest radiology practices continue to grow, adding imaging centers, increasing productivity and launching MSOs.

Could luminescence breakthrough improve medical imaging?

Scientists at the University of Vermont (UVM) and Dartmouth College said they’ve identified a new form of light called SOKR, according to a statement—one that may, in time, have implications for medical imaging.

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