You are here

Policy

 

At least five states have introduced legislation requiring insurers to cover Digital Breast Tomosynthesis, also known as 3D mammography. The economic and clinical benefits of DBT are well-established, but the passage of the bills may come down the legislative climate of the individual states, according to Eugenia Brandt, Director of State Affairs for the American College of Radiology.

The Affordable Care Act (ACA) out-of-pocket provision for preventative care increased screening uptake, especially among lower-income patients, but the ACA’s impending repeal could undo those gains, according to industry experts.

A group of nuclear energy executives and consultants refuted the nearly 80-year-old belief that low doses of radiation can eventually cause cancer, instead positing that it produces a beneficial biological response, in an article published in the Journal of Nuclear Medicine.

Researchers found decreasing imaging utilization in states with stronger physician protection from malpractice suits, according to a study published in the Journal of the American College of Radiology.

In a study conducted by the Harvey L. Nieman Health Policy Institute and published in the Journal of the American College of Radiology, researchers found problems with the current MACRA/MIIPS reporting framework, citing a too-low threshold of patient encounters and surgical codes where radiologists are no longer eligible for certain considerations.

 

Recent Headlines

Five states pushing for mandated DBT coverage

At least five states have introduced legislation requiring insurers to cover Digital Breast Tomosynthesis, also known as 3D mammography. The economic and clinical benefits of DBT are well-established, but the passage of the bills may come down the legislative climate of the individual states, according to Eugenia Brandt, Director of State Affairs for the American College of Radiology.

Op-ed: ACGME policy puts undue pressure on small radiology residency programs

An op-ed in the Journal of the American College of Radiology argues pressure to comply with the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education’s standardization of policy for all programs creates problems for certain small radiology programs.

Lack of detail on ACA replacement could spook patients, practices

The lack of specifics on an Affordable Care Act (ACA) replacement could have deleterious effects on cancer screening rates and other preventative care, according to Geraldine McGinty, MD, assistant professor of radiology at Weil Cornell Medicine in New York.

Factions form in Quebec ultrasound reimbursement dispute

Ultrasound centers in Ontario just got a little busier, owing to an ongoing reimbursement dispute between Quebecer private imaging clinics and the Quebec public health insurance agency (RAMQ).

 
ACA repeal could reverse gains in screening

The Affordable Care Act (ACA) out-of-pocket provision for preventative care increased screening uptake, especially among lower-income patients, but the ACA’s impending repeal could undo those gains, according to industry experts.

Startup receives FDA approval for AI-assisted cardiac imaging

A wide array of automated MR segmentation techniques emerged in the new millennium, promising a new era of speed and accuracy. According to Arterys, a San Francisco-based startup promising to provide AI-driven cardiac segmentation, 2017 could represent yet another phase shift.

Dangers of medical imaging are exaggerated, according to nuclear scientists

A group of nuclear energy executives and consultants refuted the nearly 80-year-old belief that low doses of radiation can eventually cause cancer, instead positing that it produces a beneficial biological response, in an article published in the Journal of Nuclear Medicine.

Tort reform may reduce defensive imaging

Researchers found decreasing imaging utilization in states with stronger physician protection from malpractice suits, according to a study published in the Journal of the American College of Radiology.

MITA recognizes congressmen for introducing device tax repeal legislation

After introducing bipartisan legislation to repeal the 2.3 percent medical device excise tax—which took effect in 2013 before being suspended for two years on Dec. 31, 2015—Reps. Erik Paulsen, R-Minnesota, and Ron Kind D-Wisconsin, were both recognized and applauded by the Medical Imaging and Technology Alliance (MITA).

NY mammography access bill goes into effect

Women in New York may have an easier time getting a mammogram in 2017, as legislation expanding access to breast cancer screening went into effect on Jan. 1. The law mandates extended screening hours for hospitals and eliminates deductibles and co-payments for all screening and most diagnostic imaging.

Pages