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Policy

 

The medical regulatory body of the European Union (EU) recommended four gadolinium contrast agents be pulled from the market because of concerns about gadolinium deposition in the brain. The European Medicines Agency (EMA) suspended the marketing authorizations for the four agents after a review by its risk assessment committee.

The ACA replacement bill appears to leave intact pieces of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) beneficial to radiologists, namely the expansion of preventative cancer screening. While it’s an encouraging sign, the tri-part repeal-and-replace process means radiologists should keep their ears to the ground, according to Chris Sherin, Director of Congressional Affairs at the American College of Radiology (ACR).

At least five states have introduced legislation requiring insurers to cover Digital Breast Tomosynthesis, also known as 3D mammography. The economic and clinical benefits of DBT are well-established, but the passage of the bills may come down the legislative climate of the individual states, according to Eugenia Brandt, Director of State Affairs for the American College of Radiology.

The Affordable Care Act (ACA) out-of-pocket provision for preventative care increased screening uptake, especially among lower-income patients, but the ACA’s impending repeal could undo those gains, according to industry experts.

A group of nuclear energy executives and consultants refuted the nearly 80-year-old belief that low doses of radiation can eventually cause cancer, instead positing that it produces a beneficial biological response, in an article published in the Journal of Nuclear Medicine.

 

Recent Headlines

EU pulls gadolinium contrast agents over deposition concerns

The medical regulatory body of the European Union (EU) recommended four gadolinium contrast agents be pulled from the market because of concerns about gadolinium deposition in the brain. The European Medicines Agency (EMA) suspended the marketing authorizations for the four agents after a review by its risk assessment committee.

What the ACA replacement means for radiology

The ACA replacement bill appears to leave intact pieces of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) beneficial to radiologists, namely the expansion of preventative cancer screening. While it’s an encouraging sign, the tri-part repeal-and-replace process means radiologists should keep their ears to the ground, according to Chris Sherin, Director of Congressional Affairs at the American College of Radiology (ACR).

Colon cancer coalition urges lawmakers to cover virtual colonoscopy

A coalition of colorectal cancer societies and advocacy groups urged Congress to pass legislation covering CT colonography under Medicare, the latest development in a decades-long effort to increase colorectal cancer screening rates. The CT Colonography Screening for Colorectal Cancer Act (House Resolution 1298) was introduced in early March by Rep. Brad Wenstrup, R-Ohio, and Danny Davis, D-Illinois.

Five states pushing for mandated DBT coverage

At least five states have introduced legislation requiring insurers to cover Digital Breast Tomosynthesis, also known as 3D mammography. The economic and clinical benefits of DBT are well-established, but the passage of the bills may come down the legislative climate of the individual states, according to Eugenia Brandt, Director of State Affairs for the American College of Radiology.

Op-ed: ACGME policy puts undue pressure on small radiology residency programs

An op-ed in the Journal of the American College of Radiology argues pressure to comply with the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education’s standardization of policy for all programs creates problems for certain small radiology programs.

Lack of detail on ACA replacement could spook patients, practices

The lack of specifics on an Affordable Care Act (ACA) replacement could have deleterious effects on cancer screening rates and other preventative care, according to Geraldine McGinty, MD, assistant professor of radiology at Weil Cornell Medicine in New York.

Factions form in Quebec ultrasound reimbursement dispute

Ultrasound centers in Ontario just got a little busier, owing to an ongoing reimbursement dispute between Quebecer private imaging clinics and the Quebec public health insurance agency (RAMQ).

 
ACA repeal could reverse gains in screening

The Affordable Care Act (ACA) out-of-pocket provision for preventative care increased screening uptake, especially among lower-income patients, but the ACA’s impending repeal could undo those gains, according to industry experts.

Startup receives FDA approval for AI-assisted cardiac imaging

A wide array of automated MR segmentation techniques emerged in the new millennium, promising a new era of speed and accuracy. According to Arterys, a San Francisco-based startup promising to provide AI-driven cardiac segmentation, 2017 could represent yet another phase shift.

Dangers of medical imaging are exaggerated, according to nuclear scientists

A group of nuclear energy executives and consultants refuted the nearly 80-year-old belief that low doses of radiation can eventually cause cancer, instead positing that it produces a beneficial biological response, in an article published in the Journal of Nuclear Medicine.

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