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Quality

 

A lead-tip angle of 70 degrees has been established as CT pacemaker imaging’s “magic angle,” according to research published in Academic Radiology this month.

Fatigue is a real issue in radiology and affects diagnostic accuracy, according to a new systematic review of the subject published in the American Journal of Roentgenology.

Silent alternatives to conventional MRI scans are showing promising results, but reducing noise in MR angiograms (MRAs) is proving a more difficult task, a team of Stanford University scientists reported in the American Journal of Roentgenology this week.

After a negative mammogram, additional ultrasound for patients experiencing breast pain is unlikely to provide value, according to a study published by Current Problems in Diagnostic Radiology. If additional symptoms are present, however, ultrasound may be worth considering.

Radiologists have embraced patient-centered care with open arms in recent years, but a lot of the focus has gone toward explaining imaging results. So what about communicating information to patients before the exam? According to a new study published in Radiology, patients are often left with unanswered questions going into imaging exams.

 

Recent Headlines

Driving quality with imaging CDS: The right exam for the right reason

When it comes to ramping up on imaging clinical decision support, now is the time to assess your choices, set expectations, map out a plan and get the wheels of implementation turning. Imaging leaders need to play a key role in implementing CDS, educating ordering physicians and ensuring program success. The leadership team at NewYork-Presbyterian/Weill Cornell Medical Center in New York City was an early adopter of CDS. Now they are sharing their experience and expert advice on deploying targeted CDS as the right solution at the right time.

Researchers find 'magic angle' for CT pacemaker imaging

A lead-tip angle of 70 degrees has been established as CT pacemaker imaging’s “magic angle,” according to research published in Academic Radiology this month.

4 key takeaways from a systematic review of fatigue in radiology

Fatigue is a real issue in radiology and affects diagnostic accuracy, according to a new systematic review of the subject published in the American Journal of Roentgenology.

‘Silent’ MRIs making progress in clinical settings; MRAs lag behind

Silent alternatives to conventional MRI scans are showing promising results, but reducing noise in MR angiograms (MRAs) is proving a more difficult task, a team of Stanford University scientists reported in the American Journal of Roentgenology this week.

Ultrasound provides little value to patients experiencing breast pain who have had a negative mammogram

After a negative mammogram, additional ultrasound for patients experiencing breast pain is unlikely to provide value, according to a study published by Current Problems in Diagnostic Radiology. If additional symptoms are present, however, ultrasound may be worth considering.

1 in 5 patients lack information before undergoing imaging exams

Radiologists have embraced patient-centered care with open arms in recent years, but a lot of the focus has gone toward explaining imaging results. So what about communicating information to patients before the exam? According to a new study published in Radiology, patients are often left with unanswered questions going into imaging exams.

Less than 3% of online radiology resources met readability guidelines in 2016

Reputable health information and medical advice is widespread on the internet. But, in spite of abundant material, patients are far from equipped to consume the complex literature, a team of Pennsylvania-based researchers has reported.

Improving relationships between radiologists and referring physicians

Many loyal referrers can be counted on to send a steady stream of patients your way, but that can change fast when signals get crossed or decision support turns testy. 

QI project helps radiology department see significant improvements in breast positioning

Insufficient breast positioning is commonly considered the No. 1 cause for technical failure in mammograms and can cause issues in both full-field digital mammography (FFDM) and digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT). With that in mind, a team of researchers spent more than three years on a quality improvement (QI) project to improve breast positioning at their facility, writing about the project’s impact in American Journal of Roentgenology.

Q&A: Nisha Mehta on how pursuing passion projects can make radiologists better at their job

Physicians are pursuing passion projects, or “side gigs,” outside of their day-to-day responsibilities more now than ever before. Some physicians stick to healthcare, working as a guest commentator or a guest speaker, while others jump into a completely different line of work, enjoying a break from the world they’ve been surrounded by for their entire adult lives.

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