Case Studies

As an integrated health-delivery network comprising 13 hospital campuses, two research centers and a health plan with more than half a million subscribers sitting atop the biggest biobank with whole exome (DNA) sequence data in existence, Pennsylvania’s Geisinger Health System is one of the best-positioned institutions in the U.S. to explore the possibilities and initial successes of AI in healthcare. The institution is bringing complex algorithmic concepts to everyday patient care and showing others the path forward.

It’s all about the data. We’ve been saying this for years. We can choose to look at this in one of two ways. It’s either a constant truism or it actually evolves and gains mass over time. In the age of artificial intelligence, it is both. 

Artificial and augmented intelligence are driving the future of medical imaging. Tectonic is the only way to describe the trend. And medical imaging is at the right place at the right time. Imaging stands to get better, stronger, faster and more efficient thanks to artificial intelligence, including machine learning, deep learning, convolutional neural networks and natural language processing. So why is medical imaging ripe for AI? Check out the opportunities and hear what experts have to say—and see what you should be doing now if you haven’t already started.

Medical imaging is in a big battle with big data. There’s too much data in too many locations, and most often they are not well managed. Data are clearly imaging’s most abundant yet most underutilized strategic asset. 

If you’ve seen one data center, you’ve seen them all. That’s what Charles Rivers believed, at least.

Like every American academic healthcare institution, SUNY Downstate Medical Center in Brooklyn, N.Y., is a beehive of activity in three overlapping yet distinct areas of focus—patient care, physician education and medical research. 

Bill Lacy, vice president of medical informatics at FUJIFILM Medical Systems U.S.A., spoke with Radiology Business about AI’s impact on radiologist workflow and what the company has planned for HIMSS19.

A family from Pennsylvania’s Plain People community, which consists primarily of Amish and Mennonite families, recently took their child to Cardiology Care for Children (CCC), a small yet regionally renowned practice in Lancaster.

Fourteen years ago, radiologist Dean R. Ball, DO, founded a breast imaging practice to meet the needs of the underserved communities in and surrounding Youngstown, Ohio. Today, the practice Ball founded, Tiffany Breast Care Center, employs 16 mammography staffers, up from five in 2004. Although the practice has grown significantly, Ball is committed to reading the X-ray images for each of his patients—which is upwards of 15,000 annually.

In today’s era of value-based care, healthcare providers and vendors are more focused on customer service than ever before. FUJIFILM Medical Systems U.S.A., Inc. (Fujifilm), for instance, recently made significant strides with its own customer service, skyrocketing to the top of MD Buyline’s customer experience ratings for digital radiography (DR) portables, flat panel detectors and DR rooms (MD Buyline Q3 2018) which includes the highest rating in the portable category for Service Response Time and Service Repair Quality.

Hackensack Meridian Health Hackensack University Medical Center is the largest provider of inpatient and outpatient services in all of New Jersey. In fact, the 781-bed teaching and research hospital—which first opened its doors in Hackensack back in 1888—was ranked No. 1 in U.S. News & World Report’s 2017-2018 Best Hospital rankings for the entire state.

For-profit and not-for-profit healthcare facilities may value the health of their cath lab employees differently. Without a clear indication of the bottom-line impact, some hospitals may be forgoing protective equipment and sacrificing the long-term health of their workers. Should the C-suite prioritize worker health when allocating investment dollars?