University Hospitals in Cleveland is half of the way through implementing a true enterprise image-management solution—a.k.a. VNA (vendor neutral archive)—and one key insider sees the advance as “a huge goldmine for patient care.”

Radiographs of the ankle, hip and knee getting coded as mammograms; a popular code-assist product failing right out of the gate and remaining troublesome months later; small billing companies shuttering their offices, leaving physician practices without any billing services at all. These are some of the scenarios reported in the wake of the Oct. 1, 2015, launch of the 10th revision of the International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems (ICD-10).

Countless healthcare providers of every type heaved a sigh of relief when CMS announced a one-year grace period following the Oct. 1, 2015, launch of ICD-10.

How do you lead change—even when you’re not in charge? The answer to that question is both simpler and subtler than one might think, and it’s readily applicable to radiologists, radiology business managers, radiology technologists and everyone else within the sphere of medical imaging.

Every year, the HIMSS annual meeting tackles the biggest issues in healthcare informatics, and managing medical images is always a big topic of discussion. This year’s focus is on enterprise imaging and the inherent challenges with managing different types of images from the various specialties around a hospital or system.

Relationship building is one of the most time consuming aspects of running a business.

Things are a bit complicated in healthcare, to say the least. Whether it's additional regulations, a competitive market or changing patient demographics, care delivery is becoming more complex every year.

A full year has gone by since 425-bed Northridge Hospital Medical Center in Los Angeles went live with a new enterprise-wide EMR solution from Cerner.

In order for radiologists to generate the most value for their patients and referring providers, they need to be equipped with all the right tools during their workflow. That includes adequate context in the form of patient data.

Click. Click. Click. An excessive number of mouse clicks—and subsequent ticking of the clock—is not something radiologists want to hear when interpreting an image.

Hailing a taxi used to be a low-tech process. You'd walk out to the street and raise your hand, sometimes whistle, and a nearby cab would see you and take you on your way. Then came Uber.

It was a gutsy move even by the standards of the borough that is home to the New York Yankees, the birthplace of hip-hop, and the largest zoo in the East: At just 23 years old, with no direct experience in healthcare, Joel Reisman decided to dive into the deep end of the outpatient medical imaging business in the Bronx.