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Irish researchers have found that on-the-job training quickly hoists new radiologists’ know-how, at least as regards appropriateness of imaging ordering, well above their competence levels heading into—and even upon completion of—their final year of medical school. 

While early screening and detection can play an important role in preventing breast cancer, new research from Mayo Clinic shows that some women, particularly minority women, aren’t being screened as often as their white counterparts. 

Many American physicians aren’t accustomed to treating neglected tropical diseases (NTD), simply because many of their patients just don’t catch them. Illnesses like leprosy, Chagas disease and leishmaniasis, rarely plague people in the U.S.

Imaging centers and public health organizations may need to devote additional resources to provide access to follow-ups after a positive mammography, according to Louise Henderson, PhD, assistant professor at the University of South Carolina School of Medicine Department of Radiology.

Nearly a third of post-breast cancer women are slipping through the cracks in our mammography system, according to a presentation at the 2016 Annual Clinical Congress of the American College of Surgeons.

 

Recent Headlines

Radiology residents vs. final-year students: What a difference a year of clinical practice makes

Irish researchers have found that on-the-job training quickly hoists new radiologists’ know-how, at least as regards appropriateness of imaging ordering, well above their competence levels heading into—and even upon completion of—their final year of medical school. 

Kaiser Permanente opens three new locations

Kaiser Permanente has started off 2017 with a fresh start, as they opened up three new medical offices to offer services including general radiology, mammography and mental health.

Global Kinetics, uMotif partner to find Parkinson’s disease treatments

To advance the treatment and understanding of Parkinson’s disease, Global Kinetics, a digital health company in Australia, and uMotif, an English tech company, have entered a partnership to offer a data platform that will explore the issue.

Mammography disparities found among black, Hispanic women

While early screening and detection can play an important role in preventing breast cancer, new research from Mayo Clinic shows that some women, particularly minority women, aren’t being screened as often as their white counterparts. 

RSNA 2016: How imaging can help treat Zika, other tropical diseases

Many American physicians aren’t accustomed to treating neglected tropical diseases (NTD), simply because many of their patients just don’t catch them. Illnesses like leprosy, Chagas disease and leishmaniasis, rarely plague people in the U.S.

RSNA 2016: More research, awareness needed in fight against prostate cancer

The negative impact of prostate cancer is woefully underestimated by the public, according to Colleen A. Lawton, MD, professor and vice chair of radiation oncology at the Medical College of Wisconsin. She reviewed the history of prostate cancer screening and treatment in the Annual Oration in Radiation Oncology address at RSNA 2016.

Radiology increasingly responsible for feeding tubes

The past two decades have seen a drastic decline in enteral access procedures among Medicare patients, according to a study published in the Journal of Vascular and Interventional Radiology.

Case study: Radiologists should be cautious when delivering 'bad news'

For patients, receiving the results of radiology reports can prove to be stressful experiences. The moment after the information is shared, they will either be breathing a sigh of relief—or the complete opposite. 

Patient insurance status can predict delaying follow-up mammograms

Imaging centers and public health organizations may need to devote additional resources to provide access to follow-ups after a positive mammography, according to Louise Henderson, PhD, assistant professor at the University of South Carolina School of Medicine Department of Radiology.

Treats, no tricks: Virginia imaging facility offers free x-rays of Halloween candy

Patient First, a chain of urgent care and primary care centers in the Mid-Atlantic region of the U.S., has announced it will offer free digital x-rays of bags of candy for trick-or-treaters. The service will provide a bit of peace of mind for parents and children, in light of reported stories of foreign objects showing up in candy.

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