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When Issack Boru was growing up in Ethiopia, his father suffered a head injury, but was unable to receive the care he needed due to a lack of medical imaging resources. This made an impact on Boru, who now works as a radiology imaging supervisor and volunteers to provide training all over the world.

The American College of Radiology (ACR) has asked radiologists and other healthcare professionals to send them invoices that reflect the real-world costs associated with purchasing ultrasound equipment.

A funny thing happened on the way to PaRADigm 2019, the upcoming annual meeting of the Radiology Business Management Association. Where RBMA usually draws speaking proposals from 50 or 60 potential presenters, this time nearly 90 came in. That was far more than the 42 slots allotted for breakouts, so the association will have plenty of material to pick from as it organizes webinars and other educational events over the coming months. 

If some form of practice consolidation is in your radiology practice’s present or future, you should know that many tactical errors are made around the difficulty of sharing information across disparate legacy PACS packages and other peripheral solutions used by newly conjoining practices, departments or organizations. 

More than a few malpractice suits have been advanced on easily understood emotion over hard-to-parse scientific evidence. It’s better to be cautious now than to get caught off guard later. Here’s how to prepare.

AHRA and Canon Medical Systems USA have announced the recipients of seven grants aimed at improving patient care and the safety of diagnostic imaging.

Radiologists can help patients understand the significant hazards associated with obesity, according to a new commentary published in Academic Radiology.

RBJ asked for—and received—in-depth answers to six high-level questions about data analytics. What all these Q&A sets have in common is the supplying of a fresh insight or two (or three) into tapping data for its power to prove value and bolster the bottom line.

When it comes to acquiring medical equipment, the decision on what make, model and options to choose is often easier than how to pay for the shiny new hardware. And the bigger the layout of dollars, the knottier the tangle of choices.

Those of us who’ve seen Generation Y progress from the digital playground to places alongside us in the workplace sometimes make too much of our differences. We tie ourselves in knots trying to figure out what makes members of this generation tick. What unleashes their endorphins. What we must do to “meet them where they are.” 

Lung cancer screening (LCS) with low-dose CT (LDCT) is an effective tool for reducing lung cancer mortality among high-risk individuals, yet utilization of such screening remains low. What can be done to remedy this situation?

Whenever advanced imaging for low-back pain gets knocked as the “poster child” for overutilization in U.S. healthcare—not an uncommon occurrence—the context of the charge tends to waft away, unconsidered. That’s problematic. To be sure, lumbar-spine MRI in particular has a dicey cost-benefit proposition all its own. The scan’s technical component alone can ring up a bill north of $3,000.