Imaging Informatics

A hospital-based breast imaging clinic implemented a real-time location system (RTLS) to track its workflow, learning important information that will lead to better patient care moving forward.

Radiologists find value in the usage of interactive multimedia, such as hyperlinks, into their clinical reporting, according to new research published in the Journal of the American College of Radiology.

Going by structural MRI of the brain, older people under 80 who have normal cognitive function but poor sleep quality are at heightened risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease or amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI).

Radiologists on the receiving end of anonymous corrections during peer-review processes are more likely to subsequently dole out anonymous corrections to other rads—and the effect is especially pronounced when the original “gotcha” was issued over a miss that had no clinical significance.

Patient information in imaging orders sent via electronic health records (EHRs) is less complete and less reliable than that found in physician notes on the same patient in the same EHR.

As radiologists continue to emphasize demonstrating their value to patient care, there has been a push to standardize the language used in radiology reports. According to a new commentary published in Academic Radiology, however, those in favor of such a shift could end up regretting it.

Using clinical decision support (CDS) to send primary care providers (PCPs) personalized report cards evaluating their ordering decisions can reduce outpatient lumbar spine (LS) MRI orders for lower back pain (LBP), according to a new study published in the American Journal of Roentgenology.

Imaging clinical decision support has long been widely considered a “when, not if” technology. But the smart money says to hold off at least a while longer before declaring the coast completely clear. What’s the holdup? In a word, complexity.

Diagnostic certainty phrases (DCPs) are common in radiology reports, helping the radiologist convey certainty in an imaging finding or its clinical significance. According to a new study published in Academic Radiology, however, radiologists use a wide variety of DCPs, and reducing this variation could improve the overall quality of radiology reports.

Point-of-care photographs obtained at the same time as medical imaging studies can be helpful for radiology providers. According to a new perspective piece published in the American Journal of Roentgenology, however, specialists should still make sure they do their homework before using such photographs in their practice.

Radiologist Paul Chang, MD, medical director of enterprise imaging at the University of Chicago, began his presentation Tuesday, Nov. 27, at RSNA 2018 by saying radiologists were in need of a reality check when it comes to artificial intelligence (AI).

Medical imaging equipment is highly susceptible to cyberattacks, putting hospitals and imaging centers at a serious risk of losing functionality of those systems and even having data stolen by an outside entity. This concerning issue is the focus of two studies being presented at RSNA 2018 in Chicago.