Quality

Treating pediatric Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) patients with chemotherapy followed by radiotherapy results in a better five-year survival rate than chemotherapy alone, according to new findings published in JAMA Oncology.

Unnecessary imaging is a serious problem in the United States. So what can be done about it? A new analysis published in the Journal of the American Medical Association explored that very question.

The overall cancer death rate in the United States has dropped 27 percent in the last 25 years, according to a new report from the American Cancer Society (ACS). This means approximately 2.6 million fewer people have died from cancer during that time.

Using a dedicated expeditor in the emergency department (ED) can improve CT imaging workflow, according to a new case study published in the Journal of the American College of Radiology.

Quizzing healthcare providers on their smartphones can lead to better patient care, according to a new case study published in the Journal of the American College of Radiology.

The more emergency physicians order imaging and consult with specialists, the more likely they are to spur a “diagnostic cascade” of medical testing that ultimately proves unnecessary. Further, patients imaged with CT as part of an initial emergency workup are highly likely to be admitted.

Exposing patients undergoing preoperative thyroid CT to less radiation and less contrast material (CM) does not have a negative impact on the overall image quality, according to new research published in the American Journal of Roentgenology.

A new analysis published in Academic Radiology explored some of the many causes of error in diagnostic radiology and what could be done to prevent those issues moving forward.

Artificial intelligence (AI) technologies have the potential to help radiologists demonstrate their value by establishing stronger emotional connections with patients, according to a new analysis published in the American Journal of Roentgenology.

The Association of Community Cancer Centers (ACCC) and Pfizer Global Medical Grants will award more than $1.8 million in funding to 15 quality improvement (QI) projects aimed at improving BRCA genetic testing for eligible breast cancer patients.

One way breast radiologists can go above and beyond to help their communities is by speaking about breast cancer and breast cancer screening to audiences of women and their loved ones, according to a new analysis published in the Journal of the American College of Radiology.

Annual mammography screening beginning at age 30 may provide value to patients with dense breast tissue, a personal history of breast cancer or a family history of breast cancer, according to new research presented at RSNA 2018 in Chicago.